Home > Xtend(2) > Groovy-type builders and JSON initializers in Xtend

Groovy-type builders and JSON initializers in Xtend

One of the nicer features of dynamic languages like Ruby, Groovy, etc. is the possibility to easily implement builders which are constructs to build up tree-like structures in a very succinct a syntactically noise free way. You can find some Groovy examples here – have a special look at the HTML example. Earlier, Sven Efftinge has written a blog on the implementing the same type of builders using Xtend. My blog post will expand a little on his post by providing the actual code and another example.

The main reason that builders come naturally in dynamic languages is that metaprogramming allows adding “keywords” to the language without the need to actually define them in the form of functions. In the case of HTML, these “keywords” are the tag names. Statically-typed languages like Java or Xtend do not have that luxury (or “luxury” as the construct can easily be misused) so we’ll have to do a little extra.

The HTML example

You’ll find Sven’s original example reproduced in HtmlDocumentExample . Note that because of the point mentioned above, we need to have compile-time representations of the HTML DOM elements we’re using. Sven has written these manually but I’m afraid that I’m lazy to do that so I opted for a generative approach. Apart from that, the example works exactly the same, so I’ll refer to his original blog for the magic details – some of which I’ll re-iterate for the JSON example below.

Generation

Some basic HTML DOM element types are provided by the BaseDomElements file. Note two nice features of Xtend 2.3+: one file can hold multiple Xtend classes and the use of the @Data annotation as a convenient way to define POJOs – or should those be called POXOs? 😉 The POJOs for the other DOM elements are generated by the GenerateDomInfrastructure main class: note they are generated as POXOs which are then transpiled into Java. After running the GenerateDomInfrastructure main class and refreshing the Eclipse project, the  HelpDocumentExample class should compile.

A JSON example

You can find the JSON example in JsonResponseExample. For convenience and effect, I’ll reproduce it here:

class JsonResponseExample {

    @Inject extension JsonBuilder

    def example() {
        object(
            "dev"        => true,
            "myArray"    => array("foo", "bar"),
            "nested"     => object("answer" => 42)
        )
    }

}

To be able to compile this example, you’ll need my fork of Douglas Crockford’s Java JSON library with the main differences being that it’s wrapped as an Eclipse plug-in/OSGi bundle and it’s (as properly as manageable) generified. In addition to the GitHub repo, you can also directly download the JAR file.

As with the HTML example, the magic resides in the line which has a JsonBuilder Xtend class Guice-injected as an extension, meaning that you can use the functions defined in that class without needing to explicitly refer to it. This resembles a static import but without the functions/methods needing to be static themselves. The JsonBuilder class has two factory functions: object(..) builds a JSONObject from key-value pairs and array(..) builds a JSONArray from the given objects.

The fun part lies in the overloading of the binary => operator by means of  the operator_doubleArrow(..) function which simply returns a Pair object suitable for consumption by the object(..) factory function. This allows us to use the “key => value” syntax demonstrated in the example. Note that the => operator has no pre-existing meaning in Xtend – the makers of Xtend have been kind enough to provide hooks for a number of such “user-definable” operators: see the documentation.

I’m still trying to find a nice occasion to use the so-called “spaceship” or “Elvis” operators: now that would be positively…groovy 😉

Postscript

I failed to notice earlier that Xtend already has an -> operator which does exactly the same thing that our => operator does. Also, the “Elvis” ?: operator already has a meaning: “x ?: y” returns x if it’s non-null and y otherwise. This makes for a convenient way to set up default values. You’ll find both overloading definitions in the org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.lib.ObjectExtensions class.

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Categories: Xtend(2)
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